Skip to content
DEAR CUSTOMERS, WE APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT AND APOLOGIZE FOR ANY DELAYS IN SHIPPING DUE TO COVID19.
DEAR CUSTOMERS, WE APPRECIATE YOUR SUPPORT AND APOLOGIZE FOR ANY DELAYS IN SHIPPING DUE TO COVID19.
Our Ingredients: Calendula

Our Ingredients: Calendula

Article Summary
Calendula has a long history of use in traditional medicine for treating common conditions affecting the skin. A versatile healer, considered safe for pregnancy, calendula may also help to relieve pain and prevent infection. 

 

 

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) is one of our favorite medicinal herbs. Gentle yet potent, we use this versatile healer in all our blends. Here are a few great reasons why we love using it.

 

Introduction

Calendula, otherwise known as English Marigold or Pot Marigold, is recognized by its distinct golden petals. Calendula has a long history of use in traditional medicine as a tonic for the skin [6]. A versatile remedy, calendula is considered a powerful antioxidant, and is among the strongest of antiviral herbs. Traditionally the flowers were made into extracts, infusions, tinctures, balms, and salves and applied directly to the skin to help heal wounds and lessen inflammation [1]. A gentle herb with very few side effects, calendula, is considered safe for expecting mothers and children. 


Benefits

Heals skin

Calendula is high in plant-based antioxidants, known as flavonoids, that give its rich color and strong anti-inflammatory properties. When used on the skin, calendula may help to accelerate the healing of broken tissues. Calendula is often included in treatments for dry skin, burns, cuts, rashes, insect stings, eczema, and dermatitis [3]. 

 

Reduces Pain

A truly versatile medicine, external use of calendula can even help to ease pain [4]. Studies indicate that calendula may help in cases of spasms, as it may help to relax tense muscles [5].

Calendula may even help to alleviate premenstrual discomforts like cramps and inflammation. The perfect ally during pregnancy, it may also help to relieve chaffing nipples and swollen breasts caused by breastfeeding. For these conditions, I recommend a cool compress or gentle massage with a calendula based balm.

 

Prevents infection

The acids contained within the plant's natural oils have potent antimicrobial and antiviral properties, particularly when fortified with sunflower oil [5]. The oils and acids are said to fight pathogens, as well as some antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. It is for this reason that calendula is a common ingredient in many antiseptic topical products [6]. 

 

Suggested use

Calendula is readily available at most speciality health food stores. For convenience, we recommend our customers try our herbal balms. 

 

If you have a little more time, why not try a herbal bath?

Adding the fresh or dried flowers to a warm bath may help to lessen feelings of stress and nourish the skin. I recommend blending calendula flowers with rose petals and English lavender flowers for a luxurious home spa experience.

 

Safety
While it can be taken internally as a tea, we recommend limiting the use of external unless under the supervision of a trained herbalist. Pregnant women should avoid the use of calendula internally. 

  

References

  1. Arora, D., Rani, A., & Sharma, A. (2013). A review on phytochemistry and ethnopharmacological aspects of genus Calendula. Pharmacognosy reviews, 7(14), 179–187. https://doi.org/10.4103/0973-7847.120520
  2. Miliauskas G, Venskutonis PR, Van Beek TA. Screening of radical scavenging activity of some medicinal and aromatic plant extracts. Food Chem. 2004;85:231–7. 
  3. Pommier, P., Gomez, F., Sunyach, M., Dhombres, A., Carrie, C., & Montbarbon, X. (2004). Phase III Randomized Trial of Calendula Officinalis Compared With Trolamine for the Prevention of Acute Dermatitis During Irradiation for Breast Cancer. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 22(8), 1447–1453. doi: 10.1200/jco.2004.07.063
  4. Easley, T., & Horne, S. H. (2016). The modern herbal dispensatory: a medicine-making guide. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.
  5. Price, A. (2017, December 4). The Antiviral Herb that May Ward Off Cancer. Retrieved from https://draxe.com/nutrition/calendula/
  6. Ashwlayan, V. D., Kumar, A., Verma, M., Garg, V. K., & Gupta, S. (2018). Therapeutic Potential of Calendula officinalis. Pharmacy & Pharmacology International Journal, 6(2). doi: 10.15406/ppij.2018.06.00171
Previous article A simple guide to essential oils during pregnancy
Next article Why balms?